Hello and thank you for coming by.
Maybe most people go for a real "professional", cold 3rd-person sound for something like this, but I'd rather write my
own mini-bio thank you very much. I promise I'll try to keep everything relevant, but on second thought, no I don't.
I hope you enjoy my music, such as it is. I also hope you
don't have a headache if you managed to read all of this
slightly scattered stuff about me. Take care.
--BitPusher
I grew up mostly in love with hiphop and electronic music.
By the age of four I knew word for word "Jam On It" by Newcleus, and was crazy about music. The very first cassette I ever
owned was bought for me when I was five, and that was "How Ya Like Me Now" by Kool Moe Dee. The first hiphop groups I
remember being obsessed with was 3rd Bass and Mantronix. 3rd Bass for the lyrics, and Mantronix had struck me because of how
different their music sounded compared to all the other rap I had, so electronic and different. They were a big influence on my
taste in sound. Anyway, I was approximately ten or eleven when I first heard the sound of a booming subwoofer in a car. My
cousin had a Toyota Tercel, and in it was an 18" Earthquake Annihilator which practically choked me because it pulled the air out
of my chest, I'll never forget how exciting that all was.

By this point, I had discovered what people liked calling "bass music." That became my next obsession, and all the time I was
asking my mother to buy me a new tape. Most kids are asking for new games, new toys, whatever, and me? Music. I wasn't even
a teenager by the time I had amassed shoe boxes full of cassettes. Techmaster PEB, Beat Dominator (Neil Case aka Bass Mekanik),
DJ Magic Mike, and many others were also giant influences on me and I found myself often listening more to this instrumental
electronic music than anything else.

Flash-forward to my later teenage years, I had been to some raves and got into the techno scene. I also acquired my first set of
turntables and a mixer working my first job at McDonalds. I had the insane fortune of going into a thrift store one day and finding
a copy of Kraftwerk's "Computer World" for all of a quarter. That discovery became the last major influence on me I can think of,
and perhaps Kraftwerk is my most revered group of musicians to this day. In the last two years of my time in high school, I
started messing with looping beats and recording my own hiphop tracks, almost completely freestyle although it's funny that I did
three CDs worth of stuff and a couple of collabos.

After high school, I began working in a warehouse and met a girl there whose fiance was a studio engineer and a DJ. Because of
getting to know them, I was introduced to live DJ'ing and to a genre called UK Speed Garage. While I was crazy about Drum n
Bass, Speed Garage broadened my tastes even further. This very man sold me my first pair of decent turntables and a 3 channel
mixer. This happening and the help of my friend lead me to spinning some live gigs for a little while, and primarily I was blending
Drum n Bass with hiphop. At some point, money got so tight and personal circumstances so screwed up that I had to sell my
equipment, I needed the money that badly. I quit anything to do with music for several years until one day I had caught a video
online of this dude named Bit Shifter mixing a live set with a pair of Gameboys. I couldn't even conceive how this was possible. A
little exploring and I learned all about chiptune, and what can I say? It resonated with me personally so much that it actually
brought me back into trying to do things with music again. The first console I ever touched as a kiddo was the Atari 2600, so I
began there and honestly the rest is history.

I'm not particularly passionate or talented, I do it all at my leisure and I do it purely for enjoyment. Thanks to the obsession with
digital bass in music that I have had since I was so young, it remains a prominent focus point if I can help it. So much so that as of
last year, I even stepped outside of pure chiptune and did an honest to goodness bass CD. Electronic music is one way or another
a life long passion of mine and I intend on always being a part of that culture, no matter how insignificant. I honestly look
forward to what kind of beats will come out of my head next.